5 Important Things to Keep in Mind When Redesigning Your Logo

By |2018-10-11T15:15:28+00:00October 24th, 2018|Web Design|

5 Important Things to Keep in Mind When Redesigning Your Logo

Logo design isn’t to be taken lightly. A strong logo can have a big impact on your business. Sometimes companies get it right the first time and never have to revisit their logo. But more often than not, a logo has to be tweaked or adjusted to keep up with shifts and changes in your company. Here are 5 things to keep in mind when you realize it’s time for a logo redesign.

What is brand equity and why does it matter?

Brand equity is defined as “the commercial value that derives from consumer perception of the brand name of a particular product or service, rather than from the product or service itself.” The key word here is perception. Perception is as much influenced by your own values as it is by the sights and sounds you experience every day. Logos are one of those sights.

Much of the equity in today’s most popular brands is stored in their logos. Target’s red bullseye, McDonald’s golden arches, and Starbucks’ mermaid are all examples of logos that hold a lot of equity. Consumers remember these marks and instantly associate feelings and emotions to them, whether they’re conscious of it or not. Like I said, logo design isn’t to be taken lightly.

Things to consider when designing your logo

A logo redesign may seem daunting and easy to de-prioritize, but making the commitment to breathe new life into something that’s worked for a while—maybe even a long while—can pay off significantly. But before you dismantle your existing logo, take some time to ensure that a redesign really is what’s needed. Considering these 5 key questions will help you understand if you should stick with what you have or take a risk and try something new.

  1. Competition?

Everybody wants to compete. Nobody wants second place. While a bit braggadocious, these principles can be applied to logo design. Logo design and redesign is equal parts competition and strategy. When designing a logo, look at what your competition is doing.

You were at the top of your game, the best in your industry and now, suddenly, you’ve got some serious competition? You can feel intimidated or you can stand up tall and fight for your place. A logo redesign can help by showing your existing customers that you’re modern and up-to-date. It will also show prospective customers that you are worthy of being considered.

  1. New audience?

You have an established customer base that’s loyal and amazing, but you’re ready to speak to younger consumers as well. A logo redesign may be just what the branding doctor ordered. Play it right and your new logo will help you connect with a new audience and still maintain your customer base.

  1. Value or mission change?

As your business grows, it may naturally evolve. If you are discovering that your company’s personality is different from when you first started, your logo redesign should reflect these changes.

  1. Business expansion?

Maybe you’ve recently added an entire line of new products or you’ve expanded your headquarters or added many new employees to your roster. If your business has expanded or changed in any way, it may be time to consider changing your logo, too.

  1. Dated logo?

It’s a simple and obvious question, but one that’s worth asking. If your logo was created in the 80s it may be time to enter the modern era. Not only is the aesthetic tired, but the design is probably not compatible with the myriad of technological devices that will be showcasing your logo—mobile devices, tablets and the like.

Creating an effective logo redesign

If eventually, you decide to rebrand or redesign your logo, you want your brand’s image to remain consistent, whether, through a logo or branded color palette, you build brand equity. And that is what people remember.

Here at Charley Grey, we are trained to speak to your audience through your website. Give us a call for more information and/or to get you started building your best brand: (317) 991-1982.

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